The Pause Principle: When/Why to Go Fast and When/Why to Go Slow

Leadership Changes Everything

For many high-octane professionals, retirement is not an option

By Robert Weisman; originally published in the Boston Globe on May 2, 2018. 

Jim Roosevelt stepped down as Tufts Health Plan’s chief executive when he was 70, about five years beyond what people used to think of as the traditional retirement age. Two-and-a-half years later, his schedule looks nothing like that of an easygoing retiree.

Roosevelt, now 72, has resumed practicing law, as a health care attorney for Verrill Dana.

He consults for Tufts on strategy and public affairs.

All told, he logs 40-hour weeks — a breeze in comparison with the 80 that he regularly clocked during his CEO days.

Roosevelt says his wife, Ann, who works 30 hours a week as a volunteer for environmental groups and as president of the Cambridge Water Board, did the math. “She said, ‘You’re a quarter-time with Tufts, a third with the law firm, and the rest with the Democrats, so you’re back to 100 percent,’ ” he recounted. “I said, ‘Yeah, but before it was 200 percent.’ ”

For many high-octane professionals like Roosevelt, retirement is a dirty word. While their hair may be thinning and they’re carving out time for one or more of the three Gs — golf, gardening, and grandchildren — they’re aiming to downshift rather than to hit the brakes, continuing to work, but at a somewhat less feverish pace. Losing the professional identity that they spent a lifetime creating is unimaginable.

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Future of Work: The Global Talent Crunch

By 2030, business will have different needs. But will there be the talent to meet them? By 2030 we can expect a talent deficit of 85.2 million workers – greater than the population of Germany. The talent crunch is coming. Are you ready? 

Korn Ferry’s latest study – The Global Talent Crunch – forecasts the gap between talent supply and demand at three critical milestones of 2020, 2025 and 2030, and across 20 developed and developing economies. This major initiative, which seeks to assist organizations with their planning and execution – helps leaders understand how talent shortages are impacting their sectors and regions where they operate so they can immediately begin to address the talent crunch, before they fall behind and suffer the economic consequences.

Download the whitepaper from Korn Ferry’s website here.

 

Time for Transformation is Now

Leadership Changes Everything

Significance Through Storytelling

 

Pathways from Management Effectiveness to Leadership Excellence

How Can You Tell Someone Has True Leadership Skills? This Legendary Football Coach Nails It With 1 Brilliant Sentence

By Marcel Schwantes; originally posted on Inc.com on February 20, 2018. 

A few days ago, I was listening to a Higher Purpose podcast where the host, Kevin Monroe, asked his guest Jeff Harmon, a leadership coach and author of The Anatomy of a Principled Leader, about the challenges of using the word “love” in the leadership and workplace sense.

Now before you get an allergic reaction to the word “love” in this sense, Harmon masterfully juxtaposes our often-misconstrued interpretation of love as a “soft” management approach to the actual management approach of one of the toughest and most revered sports icons of all time —  the legendary head coach of the Green Bay Packers, Vince Lombardi. Here’s what coach Lombardi once boldly stated:

I don’t necessarily have to like my players and associates but as their leader I must love them. Love is loyalty, love is teamwork, love respects the dignity of the individual. This is the strength of any organization. [emphasis mine]

Keep in mind, this is the same hard-driving Vince Lombardi who also made famous the statement: “Winning isn’t everything. It’s the only thing.”

That’s why his love quote is even more profound when you think about it. As Harmon pointed out, we often view any notion of leadership and love through the spiritual teachings of historical and religious figures like Ghandi or Jesus of Nazareth.

Perhaps long overdue, the no-nonsense Vince Lombardi slaps us upside the head with a sober understanding of love and leadership even more applicable for the workplace today. Surprisingly for his generation, it was this approach to coaching his players that brought the Packers total dominance in the 1960s, when they conquered five World Championships over a seven-year period (including the first two Super Bowl wins).

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Leadership from the Inside Out

By Skip Prichard, interview with Kevin Cashman.  Originally posted on SkipPrichard.com on March 12, 2018. 

I first read Leadership From the Inside Out years ago. It is one of the books that helps build a foundation of knowledge for leaders. That’s why I was excited to see that it is now out in a new version with updated chapters, new case studies and stories, and even more practical exercises to help everyone achieve their leadership potential.

Author Kevin Cashman is the Global Leader of CEO & Executive Development at Korn Ferry. He has advised thousands of senior leaders across almost every industry.

We recently talked about his updated book and his leadership views.

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