The Leadership Lift

By Susanne Blazek, Lalitha Urs, and Evelyn Orr; originally posted to Korn Ferry Institute on October 7, 2015. 

100% of respondents in follow-up interviews said they applied to their leadership what they learned years earlier in Korn Ferry’s CEI and ELI programs. They said they internalized program principles, used them to coach or mentor others, and actively refer to their strategic leadership plans years later.

When presidents, royalty, and CEOs seek to optimize their health, they turn to elite medical centers’ executive health programs, where internists, cardiologists, dietitians, and others help them elevate every aspect of their fitness. The expert teams not only prescribe a regimen but also ask—is it effective over the course of months and years?

For alumni of Korn Ferry’s Chief Executive Institute™ (CEI) and Executive to Leader Institute™ (ELI) the value of the 12-month experience—even as much as 25 years later—is sustained and powerful.

To assess the enduring impact of CEI and ELI, intensive programs that Fast Company magazine called the “Mayo Clinic of leadership development,” researchers from the Korn Ferry Institute interviewed 39 people who completed CEI or ELI between 1989 and 2013.1 The executives were asked what the experience was like for them, what they had learned about themselves, how they applied those insights to their work, and what impact on their careers they attributed to the program.

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Profit vs Purpose: The Duel Begins

By Russell Pearlman, originally published in issue 35 of Briefings Magazine, and posted on KornFerry.com on May 15, 2018. 

Kurt Graves had just heard from multiple investors in Intarcia Therapeutics, the pharmaceutical firm he runs, asking him a single question: Why wasn’t he putting Intarcia up for sale?

Intarcia is one of those “unicorns,” a firm with a multi-billion-dollar valuation. Its big product is a pushpin-sized pump that, when placed under a patient’s skin, will deliver medicine without trouble for a year. It’s a potential life changer for diabetes patients, many of whom have trouble keeping up with all the injections and pills to keep their disease at bay.

But the treatment, while succeeding in many clinical trials, was still facing months of regulatory review. Selling now, or taking the company public, the investors argued, would let the owners earn some quick short-term profits.

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The Salary Surge

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Following the launch of The Global Talent Crunch, Korn Ferry is pleased to share The Salary Surge. This latest report in our future of work series outlines the potential costs that organizations may need to pay to secure skilled talent amidst severe global skilled talent shortages.

In The Salary Surge, we project the impact that talent shortages will have on salary bills by mapping Korn Ferry’s proprietary global pay data against the skilled labor shortage estimates across 20 economies at three future milestones of 2020, 2025 and 2030.

Got a minute?  View the Infographic

Got three?  View the Executive Summary

Got 30?  Read the Report

8 Resolutions on the CEO’s Desk

Originally posted on Korn Ferry Institute on January 10, 2018. 

Some may be obvious but still get missed as the grind of the business year cycles through. Others are new and unique to 2018. Either way, the breath of this year’s resolutions that experts believe CEOs need couldn’t be wider.

A tight focus on culture, to prevent so many of crossed wires that befelled many too CEOs last year. Some real change–more than talk–about diversity at all levels. A much deeper pipeline of talent to fit the fast improving job market today. And so on, as Korn Ferry experts provides the following overview:

Create an effective culture.

As business leaders look ahead to 2018, many of them are looking for ways to drive cultural change. It makes sense: five years ago, salary and benefits were the No. 1 reason a job candidate would choose one company over another; today, culture is No. 1. Organizations have found that when they lead with purpose, transparency, fairness, and accountability, they’re able to attract and retain better talent, and inspire greater creativity and innovation—all of which ultimately helps their bottom line, experts say. And while culture permeates every aspect of a business — from its systems to its ethics to its processes — as a business leader, a change in culture starts with you. “It’s a mistake for top leaders to believe that culture is somehow separate from themselves or a separate project,” says Arvinder Dhesi, a Korn Ferry senior client partner. “Everything that we do contributes to the culture. There’s no culture-neutral behavior.”

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