Future of Work: The Global Talent Crunch

By 2030, business will have different needs. But will there be the talent to meet them? By 2030 we can expect a talent deficit of 85.2 million workers – greater than the population of Germany. The talent crunch is coming. Are you ready? 

Korn Ferry’s latest study – The Global Talent Crunch – forecasts the gap between talent supply and demand at three critical milestones of 2020, 2025 and 2030, and across 20 developed and developing economies. This major initiative, which seeks to assist organizations with their planning and execution – helps leaders understand how talent shortages are impacting their sectors and regions where they operate so they can immediately begin to address the talent crunch, before they fall behind and suffer the economic consequences.

Download the whitepaper from Korn Ferry’s website here.

 

Sponsors Play Key Role in Advancing Women to CEO Level

By Kathy Gurchiek, originally posted on SHRM.org (Society for Human Resource Management) on November 29, 2017. 

Women who are chief executive officers typically did not see themselves in that role until a supervisor, mentor or sponsor urged them to seek the position.

That is among the key findings of Women CEOs Speak, a new report from the Korn Ferry Institute based on extensive interviews with 57 current and former female chief executives in the U.S. and psychometric assessments with two-thirds of the study participants.

Korn Ferry conducted the study to learn what qualities drive the women who make up 6.4 percent of U.S. CEOs. It conducted its research from February to July 2017 with 38 current and 19 former CEOs. Among participants, 23 are or were at Fortune 500 companies, 18 are or were at Fortune 1000 companies, and 16 are or were at privately held companies.

The findings point to the importance of sponsors and mentors in preparing women for leadership positions.

Leading with Inspiration

Originally published to Korn Ferry Institute on September 24, 2017.  

In his book, “Leadership from the Inside Out: Becoming a Leader in Life,” Senior Client Partner Kevin Cashman writes about how you have to grow yourself as a person in order to grow yourself as a leader. In this excerpt, Cashman explains how to use stories to inspire action. 

Stories elevate the mind and the heart to go beyond what is, to mobilize us and others to reach new possibilities. Annette Simmons, group process consultant, understood this dynamic when she wrote, “People do not want information. They are up to their eyeballs in information. They want faith—faith in you, your goals, your success, in the story you tell.” Science has demonstrated that stories, especially stories that sustain our attention with a narrative arc and some tension, have the unique force to move us intellectually and emotionally at the same time.

In “Why Your Brain Loves Good Storytelling,” Harvard Business Review, scientist Paul Zak explains that his lab discovered more than a decade ago that the neurochemical oxytocin is necessary for humans to feel safe. Zak says, “It does this by enhancing a sense of empathy.” Our brain produces more of it each time we experience kindness and trust.

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What Now? Diversity and Inclusion in an Age of Trump — Post #3: Corporations have a Unique Opportunity to Provide Spaces for Dialogue and Healing

By Andrés Tapia, Senior Partner with Korn Ferry’s Diversity, Inclusion & Workforce Performance Practice.

Originally posted on LinkedIn.com on November 15, 2016.

CEOs have been calling me since the bombshell results of the US presidential election. They seek a sounding board for how best to respond as leaders of their organizations. They know that inside their corporate, store, plant, and factory walls flow the full crosscurrents of a polarized citizenry stoked up by poisonous rhetoric.

But they are unsure of how best to lead in these dangerous times. Do they just hope that employees will keep their thoughts and feelings to themselves while they are at work? They quickly recognize this head-in-the-sand approach will not be sustainable nor helpful but they hesitate to encourage the alternative of inviting expression from people across a wide political spectrum for understandable fear that this would only devolve into mirroring the rancor on the streets, cable news, and social media.

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